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Repainted D&D Miniatures?


tatsu
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Since a lot of the paint is blobbed on, I can't see just priming before stripping them.

 

Simple Green won't work on this paint though. I've used Acetone, it will melt the plastic though so it's not ideal (it does work though). I tried Goof Off on someones suggestion, but it didn't work for me.

 

I've heard Leather Deglazer (I believe that's what it's called) works wonders, but I've yet to find anyplace that sells it.

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My comments on repainting D&D minis...

 

Okay, I did repaint a certain model for a friend. I cleaned up a few mold lines, primed over it and repainted. I didn't bother stripping the mini. It worked out fine. the paint on there is super smooth. As long as you use a fine primer, you won't fill in the detail. I also only aimed to put a really thin coat. Since their is already paint on it, you don't really need the same coat of primer as a metal mini.

 

On a metal mini, the idea is that the primer bonds to the metal better than paint will and the paint bonds to the primer. This makes a more durable paint job. In fact, the only reason I bother priming is because the plastic paint is super slippery. I've found that thinned paints just don't want to stick to it.

 

That's my dilema. If I want to spend 8 or more hours on a mini, I'm going to buy a good one. That's not was prepainted plastic is for. Besides, the minis are mostly not that great. A few are really good. To me, as a gamer, it's something to use on a battlemat when I haven't been able to paint a whole horde of guards and orcs, etc. As it is, I only have time to paint one quality mini about every month or two. Spending more than 4 hours on a D&D mini is just time away from my good mini projects. So, stripping the mini is just too much effort.

 

However, I've found that if you spray about 2 thin coats of Testors Dull Cote on the mini, you get 2 advantages.

1) The prepainted minis are kinda glossy, the Dull Cote will give them a very nice matte finish.

 

2) You can paint over Dull Cote fairly easily, you can't paint well over the existing paint. This way, I can leave the colors that are already there, add a few washes and hightlights and I'm done. I've just made the mini look twice as good with very little time and effort.

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What I've been doing is sprayin some clear primer (it's called Adherto, made by Black Gold paints, hobby arm of House of Kolors auto paints), once that is dry then sprayin some light grey Walmart primer. Works out great, no plastic reactions, can't see the underlyin prepaint colors. Nice looking primered minis.

 

 

Got my cheap plastics(D&D iconic characters + a couple critters) off ebay the other day (cheap like 50 cents a peice, heck my fiendish T-rex was only like 2 bucks or so), gonna prep them today.

 

Day off gotta paint today!!!

 

 

Randy M

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What I've been doing is sprayin some clear primer (it's called Adherto, made by Black Gold paints, hobby arm of House of Kolors auto paints), once that is dry then sprayin some light grey Walmart primer. Works out great, no plastic reactions, can't see the underlyin prepaint colors. Nice looking primered minis.

Clear primer? Where do you get this? Why use a clear primer if you are going to cover it up with grey primer?

 

See, I want the original colors to show through. So, if the cloak is brown, I do a quick wash and a layer or two of highlights and I'm done, rather than painting the cloak over. The less time I have to spend painting a cheap plastic mini the better. This is how I approach orcs, goblins and other random monsters of no importance.

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I spray the clear over it cause I know that brand (Black Gold) won't react with plastics, as it's made for Lexan R/C bodies (it allows you to paint with regular non lexan type paints after you prime the body).

 

 

Probably a unnessecary step, but I'm a little cautious I guess. You can get the paint from a company called www.slixx.com it's under the black gold spray dept. or probably at any autopaint store. The parent company of the product is House of Kolors (HOK's website))

 

Also I guess it's a hold over step from my car models as some plastics are dark plastic (well at least older releases were) & those are hard to cover up with just a basic grey primer, but it's more or less not sure how Wallyworld primer would react with the plastics of WOTC's minis. So far so good, nice smooth even surface to start a repaint on.

 

Randy M

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I was wondering if anyone could post some "before" and after pics of their repaints please? I am considering giving this a go myself. (I love the Crow Shaman!)

I haven't bothered photographing anything yet. If you go to the D&D site, their miniatures sections has a gallery for all the set out where you can see what they look like before. On the D&D forums, you'll find several people that repaint the D&D minis and have galleries of them.

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Cade,

 

That's a great idea of painting over the existing paintjob on a dullcote! I think I might brush off the dust on these figures and make them look acceptable. :lol:

Works like a charm. Based on some article on CMON, I think "Cult of Clear Primer" or something, I've actually painted a regular mini with only testors dull cote as the primer. Works fine, though I do prefer white primer.

 

The paint jobs on the plastic minis are pretty smooth. I clean up the mini with a scalpel, overcoat it with dull cote and then touch up. Paint sticks fine to dull cote, but it won't stick well to the regular paint thats there. You can completely cover up colors area if you want, or you can just add a shadow and highlight to the already existing color.

 

Too much effort to strip cheap plastic minis with no discerable benefit.

 

I have cleaned mold lines off and reprimed white and repainted from there. That also works, but it's easier to just work with the paint jobs already there and paint over a clear coat.

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